Category Archives: Georgia

Everyone MUST go to Columbus, Georgia

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We spent a fast paced 3 days in Columbus, Georgia over the US Thanksgiving long-weekend and LOVED every minute of it. We knew very little about the town other than what I had seen online from the Kellogg and Holcombe families kayaking experiences and were blown away by the amenities, the history and the people.

Columbus is located on the Alabama/Georgia border with the Chattahoochee River running right through the middle of town. It was built on a bluff beside the river and founded in 1828, named for Christopher Columbus. In 1850 the railroad arrived and by 1860 it was one of the more important industrial locations in the south, with textile mills up and down the river. With the civil war in 1861 Columbus industries increased capacity and Columbus ranked second to Richmond as a centre of commerce within the Confederacy.

Although much of the town was destroyed at the end of the Civil War by union troops, most things were quickly rebuilt and by the Spanish-American War the town was thriving again. The addition of Fort Benning has also been a significant contribution to the community and local economy.

The late 1990’s saw a significant revitalization occurring through the establishment of a Business Improvement District downtown. This non-profit group has focused on major capital investments that have resulted in Columbus being noted as a top place to live as a young person.

We made good use of our bikes to explore Columbus and rode all the way out to Fort Benning and the National Infantry Museum (37km round trip). It was a beautiful fall day and the river walk trail is very scenic and well maintained. The museum itself is a bargain – there is no entry fee, just a requested donation of $5.00. The exhibits cover off the life of the Infantry from the Civil War to current day as well as highlighting the role that Fort Benning plays in the development of the Infantry. Needless to say, Hunter was thrilled and we spent a good 3 hours wandering around the various exhibits.

The main draw for us to go to Columbus was the whitewater play park that they have built right downtown. As part of their Ready to Raft 2012 campaign, the community developed over 8 miles of whitewater features on the Chattahoochee and some great play features right in the middle of downtown. This created the longest urban whitewater rafting venue in the world. The river is dam released and while we were there the water ranged from 1 Turbine (about 1,000 cfs) up to 3 turbines (about 8,000 cfs). At times it can run full out at between 15-18,000 cfs, which makes it the biggest water volume on the east coast outside of the Ottawa River. On both Saturday and Sunday it was running at 1 turbine during the day and then shifted to 3 turbines at 5pm. We planned our paddles to warm up at 1 turbine and then get to ride the flow increase all the way up to 3 turbines – it was really neat to see the features change as the flow increased.

There is a nice big island right at the put in and it usually attracts lots of people for photos along the river and to watch the paddling scene. The lights kick on just as dusk starts and stay until 10pm in the winter and 11pm in the summer making you feel like a total rockstar! It does help to have paddled the features during the day so you have some sense of the water…

IMG_3157Broadway Avenue is 2 blocks up from the river and full of shops and restaurants. We did not move the truck between when we arrived Friday night and when we left on Monday at lunch time. Everything we needed was in walking or biking distance, which was so handy. Best dinner was had at Your Pie – a custom pizza place in the historic district. Hand made, brick fired pizza plus yummy drinks on tap. It was so good (and came after our epic day of biking) that we ordered a full second round of pizzas!

DSCN1501Our amazing experience in Columbus was completely due to the five star service from the staff at The Outside World, a local gear store in town. They helped us find somewhere to park, pointed out everything we needed to know and were beyond friendly. They also have great gear in their store! In addition to that, every kayaker we ran into was happy to contribute to our knowledge and education about the water and the waves.

Columbus has something for everyone and we will definitely be back again!

 

 

Tybee Island, Savannah Georgia

hunter tybee turtle 2We used Tybee Island as our home base for all of our Savannah activities. It is a great little beach community about 20 minutes east of downtown Savannah. It is a bike friendly community and the local surf spot. We stayed at the Rivers End Campground, which is owned by the City of Tybee Island. It is clean, well cared for and has good internet and cable (and space for us to sprawl since it is low season).

We stayed here before and after our trip to Charleston. One of our reasons for coming was for Tim to try out some surf kayaks. Nigel from Savannah Canoe and Kayak was amazing – he spent tonnes of time with us and allowed Tim to demo abunch of boats.

We had one really nice day onour 2nd stop here so we got out for a beach bike ride and an afternoon of surfing. It was wonderful!

We would definitely recommend Tybee as a place to come and stay. It seems like it is fairly busy from March to September in terms of Campground traffic so be sure to book ahead!

the Mighty Eighth Airforce Museum

hunter historic plane 2The Mighty Eighth Airforce Museum is an impressive facility that is chock full of information, from the battles in World War 2 (1940’s)  through to the bombing of Iraq (1996).

From the perspective of one who has now seen many Army, Airforce and Navy museums (who knew I had such an interest…) this one was very well done and had a great mix of artifacts, general information and movies to keep the stories and the experiences moving through time.

We spent over 2 hours here and everyone came away having learned something new. It is just off I-95 on the western side of Savannah, with lots of parking and reasonable rates.

Exploring Historic Savannah

dot stop & to go cupAfter coming all this way, we wanted to make sure we got to experience Savannah as a “city”, with it’s food, architecture and general vibe. It was cold and yucky out (in this photo I am wearing 5 layers, hence the lovely michelin man look) so we opted for a combination of public transit and walking.

A few cool things about Savannah – they allow open alcohol as long as it is in a plastic cup (note the plastic cup with my beer from the wonderful lunch we had at the Distillery restaurant) and they have a free public transit system called DOT that takes people around the downtown area to decrease use of cars and the need for parking. We hopped on the DOT and checked out the churches and plazas on our way to the river front area, where we had planned to transfer over to the free trolley.

The river front area is accessed by multiple sets of very steep historic stone staircases. The river front street is all cobblestone, which was built from the rocks that had been used as ballast for ships crossing the ocean and then emptied out on the shore as part of the unloading process when they hit Savannah.

There is a really neat 2 tiered street area just up from the riverfront where the building are built like a split level house with river front facing businesses and openings on that side and then street facing businesses and openings another level up facing the other side. There are these funky iron bridges and walkways that are used on the upper street and you can see right down to the cobblestone area as well.

After waiting for the Trolley for 10 minutes we found a sign that said the trolley wasn’t running (turns out it was at the Georgia Railroad museum for repairs). We set off to walk along the streets and explore our way back, which was really enjoyable but led us to arrive back at the Georgia Railroad Museum parking lot later than we had planned, causing our evening adventure noted in the postscript of that post.

Georgia State Railroad Museum

hunter locomotiveThe Georgia State Railroad Museum is located just outside of the historic downtown area in Savannah. It is one of 5 sites that are run by the Coastal Heritage Society, with the focus on preserving the heritage of coastal Georgia.

It provides plenty of parking (more on that later) and is part of the discounted ticket package that you can get when you go to 3 sites (you pay for 2 and get the third for free). Very reasonable ticket prices as well.

The staff at the museum were fabulous, even with the frigid weather (note the outfits that we are wearing…). There is a series of tours that go throughout the day and they are very informative. You learn all about the executive cars, the locomotives and the various parts and history of the railyard itself.

** Note – their parking lot is gated and open between 9-5. They close the gates at 5pm and if your vehicle is still there, you are locked in. We happened to get delayed on our historic Savannah wanderings and learned all of this first hand when we arrived back past 5pm to find the truck and camper on the wrong side of a large locked gate. With this forecast to be Savannah’s coldest night in 30 years, we weren’t excited about the idea of spending the night in the camper in the parking lot. Thanks to the above and beyond assistance from Officer Santoro of the Savannah-Chatham Police Department and Nora Jones from the Coastal Heritage Society, we were rescued after 2 hours and able to head back to our campsite at Tybee Island. **