Category Archives: Canada

Paddling moms rock!

This post was originally published at: http://jacksonkayak.com/blog/2018/05/09/paddling-moms-rock/

With mothers day right around the corner, I wanted to take a moment and celebrate kayak moms, and most specifically the paddling kayak mom. Paddling kayak mom’s are lucky as they have a choice…similar to sports like hockey, soccer or swimming, a kayak mom can choose to be the shuttle driver and stand watching from the riverside OR they can chose to get in a kayak/canoe and get out on the river with their kids and their family.

Those are the moms that we are honouring today – the paddling mom. Those mom’s are a varied group – some were paddlers before their kids and continued seamlessly while their kids were young through to when they were able to get them on the water. Some were paddlers before their kids and then took a break from the sport while their kids were little, finding it again when their kids were old enough to get involved. And some jumped into the sport with both feet as their kids were learning.
These moms are amazing role models that deserve to be celebrated. They are growing a whole new generation of paddlers. They are role modelling active, healthy living and family time. They are modelling bravery and life long learning. And they are demonstrating humility and team spirit, especially as their kids surpass them. They get to be there for the lows when their children have an energy bonk and crash in the middle of the river run or stand in tears when scouting a rapid that they are terrified of. They also get to be there for the highs of that first surf, that first big drop or must make move. Sometimes they are right there in the middle of the run with their child and sometimes they have portaged the feature and are providing safety. Either way – these are now shared memories and moments that will last a lifetime.
Here are a few of the amazing mom’s that are part of the Jackson Kayak team, and their stories behind why they chose to get in the water with their families.
“I love paddling with my family for the simple fact that we are all together conquering the same hurdles, enjoying the same conquests and running the gamut of emotions at the same time. It’s pretty sweet where on any given day, I can be coached by my 15m 17 & 20 year old sons and then turn around and look like I know what I’m doing when I give the same advice to my 13, 12, 10 and 8 year old kiddos!” Susie Kellogg’
“I began paddling because my family loves to paddle and I love to spend time with my family. I love to see them try new things and improve in their skills and joke and have fun together on the river. Over time, my reason for paddling has changed a bit. Now I paddle for myself as well. I like to try new things and feel the sense of accomplishment as I improve in my skills. I love the way paddling brings our family together, and the super people we meet through the sport, but I also love it for the growth and fun that I have on the river.” Carol Walker
Where else can you immerse your family in solitude, with lessons in environment, ecology, hydrology, geology, etc.. You learn to listen, trust, follow directions – and it never ends. Every river is different, and every level is a new river. To watch your child grow on the water, learn the basic skills, and follow you – then lead you – as they grow in confidence and decision making skills, accepting risk with confidence, and making choices to walk, based on their ability and tenacity, and then realize they have surpassed you in, not only paddling, but the understanding and power of the water, and the confidence to run things you never dreamed of. That’s when you know you have raised your child the right way. When my daughter runs class 5 rivers, I’m often asked if I’m scared or worried – and I’m not. Because the river has raised her to be the person she is, and I beam with pride to know this is a direction we turned her to… and she has the knowledge, strength, confidence and skill to head down, making good decisions as she goes. These lessons transfer to a lot of life situations, and I cherish watching her handle them with poise, strength and grace. As a couple, and a family, we have trust, communication, and respect for each other and the environment, all lessons encouraged by the river, so yes, we love to paddle together! Stephanie Viselli
I love being on the water, not only with my family, but with other families. I love nothing more than seeing my kids have fun with other kids on the water while learning and challenging their skills. My favorite moments are the flat waters in between where we connect and share experiences as parents and families. I always relish in the magic of these moments never wanting them to end. Paddling with my family is our bond. We are unconnected, unplugged, not being entertained, but rather creating our own moments. I’ll never forget when I saw Jackie get her first combat rolls in the pool session. Maddie’s slug roll – no hand roll on the Ottawa. The magic is that I am not on the sideline watching as a fan, but that I am as much in the moment with them on the water as a participant in the same sport. I get to play and we get to play together.  Stace Kimmel
 
Turning moments into lasting memories, with my family, is the reason that I kayak. Not only does this sport keep me pushing myself, but the unplugged time on the rivers, with my family, creates enjoyment that I have not been able to duplicate in any other activity. Melissa Hargrove
If you are currently a riverside kayak mom – take the opportunity to get out with your family, even just for a flat water paddle, this year for Mother’s Day. If your family doesn’t kayak and you happen to be reading this – definitely give it a try. Most kayak shops offer lessons, which can be a great way to start on the water as a family together.
For us, this will be a life long sport – something we come together to do and something we do separately. It’s a shared passion, with a shared language, that allows us to meet new people, explore new places and get outside as often as possible.
Lee Vincent
ChasingtheSun

Kicking off the kayaking season – build progression into your goals

This post was initially posted at https://www.levelsix.com/blogs/blog/kicking-off-the-kayaking-season-build-progression-into-your-goals

Progression in kayaking is an amazing, terrifying and rewarding activity. It’s HARD sometimes and yet oh so worth it…

 With a fresh paddling season upon us, this is a great time to think about what your goals are for the year. It’s also a great time to be kind and generous to yourself and remember that your season does not have to be full of “go big or go home” moments. First and foremost, kayaking is supposed to be fun. Consider having progression as a goal in itself.

 We’ve learned a few tips for progression that I wanted to share:
1) If at all possible, have a home river that you can use for your progression benchmark. It is great to have a place where you are highly comfortable to measure your improvement against. Is that ferry easier than it was a month ago now that you’ve challenged yourself on some other rivers? Can you run the harder sneak and feel in control the whole time after having consistently run the easier line? What one thing can you do on this run that is different from your normal runs?
2) Find people that you trust to paddle with that will support your efforts to stretch yourself. Will they take the easier lines down a new river section for you to expand your experiences? Will they teach you how to boof that one tricky feature on your home river? They can be your biggest cheerleader and you need that when you are pushing yourself. Progression means growing, and growing often means feeling uncomfortable, which leads to a whole lot of adrenaline running through your system, which can be exhausting and overwhelming. Hence the very valuable external support.
Tim & Hunter Vincent in the Ottawa River
3) Take your time and move at your own pace. Progress doesn’t have to be linear. We have been to Kelly’s Whitewater Park in Cascade Idaho 3 times now. The first time I (Lee) didn’t go in the top hole at all. Looked at it and said, “no thank you”. The second time I went in it, got worked and again said “no thank you” for a repeat adventure. Our third trip was in late June of last year. The weather was warm and I decided that I was going to push myself. My goal was to be comfortably surfing in it by the end of our visit, which was 10 days long. I spent the first five days in “get to know you” mode. The most logical approach to the wave was through a big foamy hole and it terrified me so I practiced dropping in from up top, from entering on the far side and by just paddling into the back of the foamy hole but not actually going into the trough. Five days in and I was starting to get the feel for the foamy stuff so started dropping into the hole and just side surfing. Days 6-9 were works in progress with some big high 5’s and a few topsy-turvy beatings that had me call it a day. Day ten and I closed off my visit with entering through the hole side, front surfing the wave under control, got a spin and back surf and even had an unintended wave loop.

4) Work on the mental side of things as much as the technical and physical. Why is my 14 years old progressing faster than me? He’s more willing to throw himself into a feature and work it out than I am. Case in point is he was surfing the top feature at Kelly’s on our first trip. It was his first time surfing in a hole that big and he got stuck in a side surf, had that terrified look and feeling of fear about how am I going to get out, got worked and swam. But got back in again and carried on. Many of us adults have stronger recall of that uncomfortable feeling and don’t jump up and down to replicate it. Anna Lesveque wrote a great article on paddling resilience that is worth a read for additional tips in this area (https://mindbodypaddle.com/8287/build-emotional-resilience-water/).
5) A day on the water is better than not going out on the water. If you aren’t feeling it or the run your friends are running is just too daunting, take a look for a way to still get out and do something on the water. Can you drive shuttle and then put in from the take out and paddle up to meet them on an easier section of whitewater? Can you find a place where you can go back to basics and spend time finding the joy in jet ferries or zen-like front surfing? Can you find a nice eddy or lake and practice your flatwater skills?

Bonus: embrace the swim. It happens to everyone for one reason or another. Don’t beat yourself up. Shake your head, self-rescue, smile and then get back out there!
Tim Vincent, Columbus Georgia Chattahoochee River
 
Tim & Hunter Vincent
Tim & Hunter Vincent

 

Tips for if (when??) your kid becomes a better kayaker than you…

This post was originally published at: http://jacksonkayak.com/blog/2018/04/04/tips-for-if-when-your-kid-becomes-a-better-kayaker-than-you/

Progression in kayaking is an amazing, terrifying and rewarding activity. It’s HARD and yet oh so worth it…

Last fall there was a role swap in our family. I went from 2nd best, and the one looking out for the kid, to comfortably in 3rd place with the 14 year old kid now looking out for me.
I realized this in the late fall when we were paddling a new river and all of a sudden I was the one sandwiched in the middle rather than at the back or the front.
How did we get here was the question running through my mind at that point.
If we rewind 5 years, I had been back into kayaking for a year or two and we were teaching Hunter how to kayak. He was picking things up pretty quickly and, thanks to some creative teaching by Tim, was starting to front surf waves confidently. Watching him I realized that I was not progressing at the same pace and that if I didn’t do anything different I was going to get surpassed by my 10 year old. I was ok with getting surpassed at some point, but not that early on in the game. I picked up my socks and sent myself off to immersion kayak camp at Endless Adventures in Crescent Valley, BC where the weather and the water are warm (cold Yukon water was definitely a barrier for me). It was great to spend a week focused solely on myself and pushing my comfort zone, both mentally and physically.
That was a great jump start for the following year and then two years ago I took another step and attended EJ Week at Wilderness Tours on the Ottawa River. Another warm weather/water destination and the features definitely felt like a HUGE step up for me, especially in my first playboat. I had fabulous moments and sucky moments, with plenty of time spent swimming, but I walked away with a step function increase in my own mental confidence. I went home to our local hole and it looked so small and manageable in comparison. For the first time ever, I threw myself into the hole and was learning to loop by the end of the summer.
Last year we were on the road paddling from mid April through the end of November. We covered a number of new rivers and some old favourites as well. Through all of that, I’ve learned a few tips for progression that I wanted to share:
1) If at all possible, have a home river that you can use for your progression benchmark. It is great to have a place where you are highly comfortable to measure your improvement against. Is that ferry easier than it was a month ago now that you’ve challenged yourself on some other rivers? Can you run the harder sneak and feel in control the whole time after having consistently run the easier line? What one thing can you do on this run that is different from your normal runs?
2) Find people that you trust to paddle with that will support your efforts to stretch yourself. Will they take the easier lines down a new river section for you to expand your experiences? Will they teach you how to boof that one tricky feature on your home river? They can be your biggest cheerleader and you need that when you are pushing yourself. Progression means growing, and growing often means feeling uncomfortable, which leads to a whole lot of adrenaline running through your system, which can be exhausting and overwhelming. Hence the very valuable external support.
3) Take your time and move at your own pace. Progress doesn’t have to be linear. We have been to Kelly’s Whitewater Park in Cascade Idaho 3 times now. The first time I didn’t go in the top hole at all. Looked at it and said “no thank you”. The second time I went in it, got worked and again said “no thank you” for a repeat adventure. Our third trip was in late June of last year. The weather was warm and I decided that I was going to push myself. My goal was to be comfortably surfing in it by the end of our visit, which was 10 days long. I spent the first five days in “get to know you” mode. The most logical approach to the wave was through a big foamy hole and it terrified me so I practiced dropping in from up top, from entering on the far side and from by just paddling into the back of the foamy hole but not actually going into the trough. Five days in and I was starting to get the feel for the foamy stuff so started dropping into the hole and just side surfing. Days 6-9 were works in progress with some big high 5’s and a few topsy turvy beatings that had me call it a day. Day ten and I closed off my visit with entering through the hole side, front surfing the wave under control, got a spin and back surf and even had an unintended wave loop.
4) Work on the mental side of things as much as the technical and physical. Why is my 14 year old progressing faster than me? He’s more willing to throw himself into a feature and work it out than I am. Case in point is he was surfing the top feature at Kelly’s on our first trip. It was his first time surfing in a hole that big and he got stuck in a side surf, had that terrified look and feeling of fear about how am I going to get out, got worked and swam. But got back in again and carried on. Many of us adults have stronger recall of that uncomfortable feeling and don’t jump up and down to replicate it. Anna Lesveque wrote a great article on paddling resilience that is worth a read for additional tips in this area (https://mindbodypaddle.com/8287/build-emotional-resilience-water/).
5) A day on the water is better than not going out on the water. If you aren’t feeling it or the run your friends are running is just too daunting, take a look for a way to still get out and do something on the water. Can you drive shuttle and then put in from the take out and paddle up to meet them on an easier section of whitewater? Can you find a place where you can go back to basics and spend time finding the joy in jet ferries or zen like front surfing?
Bonus: embrace the swim. It happens to everyone for one reason or another. Don’t beat yourself up. Shake your head, self-rescue, smile and then get back out there!
Lee (Kayak Mom who’s not willing to give in yet…)

An arborist in the making…

This summer Hunter discovered the job of “arborist” – a career choice that he knew nothing about until spending time with Grandpa and learning to cut down trees.

Grandpa Bob lives along the Thames River outside of London, Ontario. He is a marathon canoeist (remember the crazy 200km race we crewed for…) and very passionate about his canoeing. He is the guy that goes out and gets rid of all of the dead fall in the river so that everyone else can have a fun day out canoeing.

These adventures out into the river are a combination of canoeing (you have to paddle both upstream and downstream to get to the trees) and tree climbing/cutting. A great cross training activity, especially because it involves saws, knives and things with engines!

It also involves balance and core strength for when you are out on thin branches hanging over the river attempting to cut other logs…

Grandpa is definitely the resident expert at this but… don’t ask him how many saws he has dropped or lost in the river over the years 🙂 Let’s just say that he’s quite committed to the river, in more ways than one.

It was a pretty awesome way to learn new skills, get out on the water and have fun with family this summer.

Hunter would also like people to know that he’s available for any and all arborist work – he’s working on collecting his own set of tools and is only a phone call away!

A crazy month on the Ottawa River…


We were up at the Ottawa River for the month of August this year and it was fabulous… It all started with a trip that Hunter and I took last year when we paddled the Ottawa River for a week and he participated in the inaugural “Little Rippers” program at Ottawa Kayak School (a primer for those too young to attend Keeners). We had so much fun that Hunter declared he wanted to attend the Keeners sport development camp this summer… so off we all went!

We kicked things off with an impromptu birthday party for Hunter, pulled together by our amazing group of River Moms (thanks Kristine, Kathy & Carol!!!). There was a water balloon attack, competitive ping pong and pool, an amazing potluck smorgasbord and of course, cake, candles and singing. Hunter was thrilled to get to celebrate his 14th birthday with his river friends.

It was quite the community of families, which made things super fun. I call this the grown up version of living in a van down by the river. Definitely not a failure in life in any way – more like a huge success; all these amazing families that spend their time living outdoors with their kids while still making a living.

We managed to get one day on the river paddling together before we had to get Hunter all packed up to go to OKS Keeners Camp. We got all of his boat outfitting figured out, pulled together his new gear from our partners at Jackson Kayak, Salus Marine and Level Six, and managed to shove it all into one small duffel bag to cover him for three weeks.

Normal late summer flows on the Ottawa River are between 1 and -2, with the sweet spot being between 0 and -1 for features like babyface and garburator to be in. Over the course of the month that we were around the Ottawa, it only hit those lower levels for a few days. Almost the whole summer has been unseasonably high, with levels in the teens in late June and people surfing Buseater into late June / early July.

Shaggy Designs has an online gauge  which became super handy as we woke up each morning and checked the gauge before making any plans. Once on the river we would also paddle by the physical gauge after McCoys to see if anything had changed. We would often see 1-2 foot swings while on the river with one day having a 4 foot drop within an hour. The blue line above is 2017, the red is 2016 and the orange is 2015. This really shows how wacky the water was from “normal” flows. Lots of speculation on why but no definitive answers…

With higher water levels we spent most of our time on the middle channel exploring new (to us) rapids and playing with the Walker family. It was fun to be a part of helping another family stretch their paddling muscles and really exciting to see the progress being made over our two weeks together. Tim’s new rack system for the truck worked out super well and left us feeling pretty pleased about having a shuttle vehicle.

Keener Camp is a kayak leadership camp, with equal emphasis on whitewater kayak skills and personal leadership skills. The kids live in houses together and are responsible for cooking their own breakfasts, dishes, and cleaning. They are also monitored to ensure they have a shower at least once a week as they are teenagers… The kayaking focus is all about progression. They figure out where you are and then gently support you through learning new skills and challenging yourself every day. Hunter loved it and is already talking about going back again next year. His description was that he learned to be a better kayaker and a better person…

Left to our own devices we managed to get out and kayak almost every day as well as go on some adventures. Our first woods walk was really buggy and we regretted forgetting the bugspray. For our second walk we thought about the bugs and put on long sleeves and long pants but yet again forgot the bugspray, which turned a 2 hour wander through the woods into a true effort of perseverance. At about 45 minutes in we decided to continue to push forward, having no idea where we were, purely because we didn’t want to turn around and walk back through the ravenous bugs we had just made it through! There are lots of walking, hiking and biking trails in the area to help fill your time off the water.

One Friday evening we all headed out to the Corner Wave Classic event (like a hometown throw down competition). Transportation is always a fun challenge. With the main event being spectating and the secondary event being fishing, we managed to get 8 boats, 8 people, coolers and fishing gear on and in the suburban. It was a super fun night out with friends, treats and a campfire. Pretty impressive when the local friday night competition has Dane Jackson, Nick Troutman, Clay Wright, Bren Orton, Emily Jackson and Claire O’hara in it!

The Ottawa Valley runs right along the Ottawa River and has strong french influences from Quebec, which is just on the other side of the river. One of the must-haves when in the valley is Poutine, and you need to get it from Tammy’s Taters chip truck in Renfrew (in the Walmart/Canadian Tire parking lot). YUMMY…

While the Ottawa River has some amazing rapids, it also has big chunks of flat water. The warm water makes this a great time to practice all of your flat water skills and generally goof around with friends!

Tim had a small mis-hap on the river (accidental paddle to the head from a kid) so we went to check out the Renfrew ER and then wallow in ice-cream cake from Dairy Queen, because it makes everything better!

Being a teenager, we really didn’t hear much from Hunter unless he needed something (laptop, go pro, blanket, money etc.). It was nice being just down the road and able to drop things off as well as get glimpses of him on the river.

Our time on the river ended with one last family day after Hunter finished camp. It was pretty great to see all the new skills he learned and how his confidence has increased. One Lower No Name, one of the last rapids on the middle channel, he snagged a 5 minute surf while everyone else was coming down the river around him. Tim sat at the bottom of the river and said “that’s my boy” full of fatherly pride, which is priceless.

We definitely recommend the Ottawa River as a kayaking destination for families. We stayed at River Run Resort in their new RV sites and it was super handy being at the take out, just a short distance from the river. Lots of places to play for kids as well as washrooms, showers and internet.